David Nadile of Bedford Speaks at State House Legislative Breakfast

David Nadile of Bedford recently addressed legislators at the Massachusetts State House - Image (c) maaps, 2016 all rights reserved
David Nadile of Bedford recently addressed legislators at the Massachusetts State House – Courtesy image (c) 2016 all rights reserved

Special to The Bedford Citizen

David Nadile, of Bedford, and Howard Rossman, director of Dearborn Academy, the therapeutic day school in Arlington that David attended.
David Nadile of Bedford, and Howard Rossman, director of Dearborn Academy, the therapeutic day school in Arlington that David attended. Courtesy image, (c) 2016, all rights reserved.

On February 10 David Nadile of Bedford shared his success story and discussed the need for funding to benefit special needs students during a private legislative breakfast with local lawmakers at the State House. The event was sponsored by maaps, the Massachusetts Association of 766 Approved Private Schools.

Nadile came to Dearborn Academy, a therapeutic day school in Arlington, when he was 6 years old, struggling with his emotions, learning and behavior.

Since then, he was able to make great strides through the school’s specialized learning and clinical services. Despite his many challenges, he was always able to accept help and was motivated to change.

After earning his high school diploma at Dearborn in June, 2012 Nadile attended the automobile mechanics program at Minuteman Technical Institute and worked at Dearborn Academy for four summers.

Now 22, Nadile works at The Cheesecake Factory and plans to continue his career in automobile mechanics.

About maaps:

The Massachusetts Association of 766 Approved Private Schools (maaps) is a non-profit association whose 87 member schools provide high quality and cost effective educational programs and services to students with special needs throughout Massachusetts.  The schools operate over 150 day and residential programs and schools, providing education and treatment to approximately 5,500 Massachusetts students with disabilities. They also bring in over $144 million into the Commonwealth’s economy in tuition payments from about 1,500 out-of-state students, and employ over 9,000 teachers, clinicians, residential care and other staff.  For many of the students, maaps schools represent their first real opportunity for hope, achievement and to become productive members of society.


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