Native American Powwow at the Bedford VA Hospital This Weekend

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The Thirty-Seventh Annual Bedford Powwow, a Native American cultural event, is being held on the grounds of the Bedford VA Hospital, at 200 Spring Rd., Bedford MA. Everyone is invited, and admission is free to this family-oriented event. It’s called a Powwow, which is a word that has come to mean ‘a gathering of the people.’

Native People take this as an opportunity to join with one another to celebrate their heritage and culture through Drumming, Dancing, Singing, and Trading, in a drug and alcohol-free environment. This is also an opportunity for Non-native People to participate and experience first-hand knowledge of Native American ways and traditions directly from the source, who are, this land’s original people.

Grounds open at 10 a.m. with the Grand Entry Ceremony at noon each day. The Dance Circle, trading and other activities continue until, at least, 4:30 p.m. Parking is free and abundant. This location is handicapped accessible, as well. Venders and traders are by invitation only. Free camping is available from Friday at 3 p.m. until the Powwow ends Sunday night.

The co-hosts of this event are the Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Medical Center (Bedford VA Hospital) and the Greater Lowell Indian Cultural Association (GLICA), a Massachusetts 501(c)3 Nonprofit Corporation. For information, please call Chief Tom Eagle Rising Libby at 978-551-2203, Elder Chief Dawn Quiet Rabbit Seeking Sullivan at 978-270-0879 or our Bedford VA Point of Contact Tracy Claudio 781-687-2612.

All donations are gratefully accepted. Any money raised at this Powwow will go towards the funding of GLICA’s continued policy of free public admission and open access to all people for the educational, cultural and community activities that are provided during the year.

Please help the Greater Lowell Indian Cultural Association, one of the original Native American organizations in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, by informing your readers about this spiritual, cultural and educational experience. We wouldn’t say no, we’d say “THANK YOU.”