Letter to the Editor: Quarantine: Is Staying at Home All That Bad?

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As we find ourselves amidst a pandemic it can be easy to lose sight of all of the good that is happening around us.

The number of confirmed Covid-19 cases and related deaths continues to increase by the hour, and the supplies that keep us safe are scarce, so it is only natural to be overwhelmed with fear.

Our schools are closed and plans postponed as we work and study from home and isolate ourselves from our loved ones. Our daily lives have seemingly come to a complete stop in an effort to “flatten the curve” and minimize the harm the virus has already caused. We all are fighting towards the same goal but yet our efforts are met with disappointment and disruption.

Where do we begin to find solace in this time of unprecedented uncertainty?

Before quarantine, we sat in coffee shops with our friends, dreaded going to our early morning classes, and could not recall the last time we ate a home-cooked meal with our parents and siblings. We took our simple interactions for granted because we never dreamed of a day where they would not be a reality.

The world has been given a gift that everyone had previously lacked: time. As we sit at home with fewer responsibilities, we find ourselves reconnecting with our families, spending time in nature and appreciating home goods that we took for granted.

Covid-19 may be attacking our physical bodies, but it cannot diminish the power of the human spirit.

Endicott College and other universities have donated medical supplies to local hospitals, generous individuals spend hours crafting reusable face masks to protect our nurses and doctors, neighbors are checking in on and delivering food to the elderly nearby — generosity and kindness have filled the void the lack of certainty has caused.

As each person finds him or herself unsure of what tomorrow holds, they have gained a better understanding of the struggles of others.

We may be six feet apart in physical distance but Covid-19 has brought communities together and individuals closer to nature.

The tragic reality of the virus cannot be overlooked but we must ask ourselves if staying at home for the upcoming weeks “is really all that bad?”

Editor’s Note: Bedford resident Maria Wilson is a Journalism major in the Class of 2022 at Endicott College


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