Recycling Know No’s ~ Part One: Don’t Bag Recyclables!

Recycling is good. It helps the environment, helps the town, and makes you feel you’re doing your part. That being said, not all things are easy to recycle, no matter what you may think. Putting your Styrofoam coffee cup in the bin might feel right, but is actually detrimental and costly to us in Bedford. There are other things that fall into the category of “should” be recycled, but without understanding what happens “downstream,” your wishful thinking could end up causing more trouble. You may not have been aware that all recycled material gets sorted, and one of the most cost effective sorts happens at your bin. Understanding what happens after your recycling bucket has been collected can help make that downstream work easier. Accordingly, we are embarking on a new series that hopefully will answer the “whys “ and “whats” of recycling here in Bedford.

The Bedford Citizen has teamed up with Ed McGrath from the Bedford Department of Public Works in a new segment called “Know-Nos of recycling” to explain what happens once you put something in the recycle bin. We’ll also explain why it’s so important to only put the correct stuff in your recycle bins. If you have questions, please send them along.

Question #1 ~ We see the signs ~ DON’T BAG Recyclables

Kathryn Aalto ~ The Natural World of Winnie-the-Pooh ~ A Garden Club & First Parish Lyceum Program

By Andrea Cleghorn

Before an enthusiastic audience of more than 100 at First Parish on the Common, author Kathryn Aalto talked about her book, The Natural World of Winnie-the-Pooh. Her talk here was co-sponsored by the Bedford Garden Club and First Parish Lyceum.

A nature writer, landscape designer, and historian, Aalto talked about the physical world of 1920s-era England that provided the landscape for the well-loved children’s book Winnie the Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner.

100 Years Ago This Week ~ Bedford News in the Concord Enterprise ~ September 11, 1918

Selected and transcribed by Dennis Ahern

Roll of Honor of Bedford Boys in the U. S. Service

The Public Safety committee acting as a committee on permanent records earnestly requests any person noticing any error or omission in this list, kindly to notify George R. Blinn, chairman.

There will be a card catalogue later for all relatives and friends of our boys in the service, to consult, and it is hoped information will be sent of changes in address or appointments to different service. A photograph is much desired for filing with each card.

100 Years Ago This Week ~ Bedford News in the Concord Enterprise ~ September 4, 1918

Selected and transcribed by Dennis Ahern

Editor’s Note: The fourth in our Friday series examining the news about Bedford that was published in the Concord Enterprise 100 years ago this week; to contact the author, please email thebedfordcitizen@gmail.com

BEDFORD UPDATE

Clifford Day spent the past week with his son in North Woodstock.
A number from this town motored to Lexington to enjoy the annual field day given by the Catholic club on the grounds of their clubhouse.
George Thompson has been enjoying a two-week vacation from his duties with the B. & M. (Boston & Maine Railroad)

WELCOMED SON

Many of this town are interested to hear that Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Albani of Somerville are receiving congratulations on the birth of a son born Saturday. Up to the time of his marriage, he was a resident of this town and is the son of Cosmo Albani.

Photographer Jeff JHO Hoyland on The Art of Coaching Girls’ Sports

By Jeff JHO Hoyland

Editor’s Note: This is a blog post that Jeff authored in January 2009. With the autumn sports season getting underway, it seems like a good way to introduce new families to Jeff. You can see his current photographs on the Bedford Snapshots Facebook page – www.facebook.com/pg/BedfordSnapshots/photos. Thanks, Jeff — we’re all looking forward to another great year!

We all need therapy. My therapy is coaching children’s sports. I’ve coached both girls’ and boys’ soccer. My total experience in playing soccer is spring leagues in high school. I was by no means the best soccer player out there; however, I had the sheer will to make thing happen.

If you get the chance, I recommend coaching girls’ sports- you will learn more about yourself and your ability to motivate others than any training you can take.

100 Years Ago This Week ~ Bedford News in the Concord Enterprise ~ August 28, 1918

DEATH FOLLOWED BEAR ATTACK

Carl Hulner of Billerica, whose right arm was nearly torn off by a pet grizzly bear at Lexington Park, August 10, 1918, died at the Symmes Arlington hospital where he was rushed following the accident. The man went inside the guardrail at the bear pit in the park to feed the bear peanuts. He dropped the bag and as both he and the bear made a grab for them, he accidentally hit the bear on the nose. This angered Bruin, who attacked Hulner.

100 Years Ago This Week ~ Bedford News in the Concord Enterprise ~ August 21, 1918

Selected and transcribed by Dennis Ahern

Editor’s Note: The second in our Friday series examining the news about Bedford that was published in the Concord Enterprise 100 years ago this week; to contact the author, please email thebedfordcitizen@gmail.com

ANNUAL LAWN PARTY

The annual lawn party in aid of St. Michael’s church of this town will be held Saturday, Aug. 31, at the West Bedford campgrounds. Various amusements and entertainments will be provided for those in attendance. The party will open at 12 o’clock noon and will continue to 11 p. m.

100 Years Ago This Week ~ Bedford News in the Concord Enterprise

Selected and transcribed by Dennis Ahern

Editor’s Note: Introducing a Friday series examining the news about Bedford that was published in the Concord Enterprise 100 years ago; to contact the author, please email thebedfordcitizen@gmail.com

MISS KELLEY WON PRIZE
A novel feature of the season was the Amateur night at Lexington park Friday evening. Some fine local talent was displayed, several cash prizes were awarded to those participating in the entertainment. Miss Gertrude Kelly, North Rd., of this town, took second prize. She sang two solos, “Keep the Home Fires Burning,” and “There’s a Long Long Trail.”

A Slice of History: Bedford Springs, the New York Pharmaceutical Company, and the Hayden House

By Julie McCay Turner

Some would say that a house is just structure built of bricks and mortar, but houses hold the history of their place and the stories of their families.

The residence at One Fawn Circle is still known as the Hayden house. It was built in 1926 by Sarah Holden Hayden to draw her son Arthur Holden Hayden back to Bedford so he could assume control of his father’s company, New York Pharmaceutical Corporation, and continue the production of HVC, Hayden’s Viburnum Compound, after his brother William’s death in 1923.

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